Raising a Winner

Okay parents; time to get out your pencil and paper! Here come five concrete things you can do to raise a winner.

First, stay on your toes. Keep a close eye out for those things your kids do well and use the opportunity to say, “Way to go!” Praise is the first and best step in helping kids feel successful.

Second, set reasonable standards. It’s important to expect kids to do their best, but their best may not always be all we’d hoped. Sometimes we need to lower our expectations instead of pushing harder. Third, be their number one fan. Look for chances to build them up in front of friends and family members.

Fourth, celebrate when they succeed. Mark your child’s accomplishments by taking them out for a special dinner or event—and rejoice as a family.

And finally, be a winner yourself. Kids model what they see, and when their parents succeed, they’re more likely to succeed as well.

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