Moving Forward by Looking Back

Looking for a way to put a spark in your marriage? Why not dig out your old wedding video?

Couples tend to spend too much time worrying about the future and not enough time looking back on special memories. Instead of focusing on what you wish you had, why not celebrate what you already have?
Drs. Les and Leslie Parrot suggest that couples find regular times to sit down and recall the great things that have happened in their marriage. Talk about the first place you lived as a couple and how fun it was decorating it together. Keep family photo albums around the house and look through them together.

Why not set a date night, and instead of going out, make popcorn and watch old home movies? Your kids may even get into it.

Then spend some time telling stories about how you met, and how you came to be married. Recall all the great family holidays you've had, and the friends you've made through the years. Nothing will strengthen the future of a marriage quicker than reflecting on the past.

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