Money Affair

Are you guilty of cheating on your spouse?

It doesn't take an affair to be unfaithful to your spouse. Today there's a new kind of cheating going on and it involves a love affair with Louis Vuitton or Macbook Pros. More than ever, people are lying to their spouses about how much they spend. In fact, according to research, this is now the most common form of deceit in marriages, affecting nearly half of all couples.

Hiding how much we spend on clothes or golf clubs does more than just leave the credit card maxed out; it creates a basic lack of trust in the relationship. And every marriage needs trust at its foundation in order to stand.

So, what's the solution? First, if you've been cheating, come clean with your spouse. Then commit to complete honesty in the future. Do whatever it takes to stay financially faithful and to rebuild the trust you may have lost.

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