Marriage Killers

It isn’t the major tragedies that tear so many marriages apart, it’s the unhealthy choices that couples make on a daily basis.

When marriages fail, most couples point to some major issue, but a relationship that’s strong should be able to weather any storm. The truth is it’s the little things that kill a marriage.

A wife may decide to hide her shopping receipts, so that her husband won’t know how much she spends on clothes. She may talk about him behind his back, or confess things to her mother about their marriage, knowing how much that bothers him.

A husband may work long hours, even though he knows how much his wife resents it. And he may sneak out for a round of golf without telling her.

It’s these small, daily dishonest choices that tear away at the foundation of a marriage. And the only way to rebuild it is through a conscious decision to change. That means doing whatever it takes to rebuild the trust you’ve lost.

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