Keeping Order in the Home

How do you keep sanity in the family when life goes screaming by at a hundred miles an hour?

Every family goes through this experience — the busyness of life takes over, creating stress for everyone. The key is to establish some ground rules to help keep order in the family.

Begin by recognising that each member of the family has a role to play, and give them a specific set of responsibilities. Children should be expected to keep their rooms neat, and have other chores around the house to do each day. Schedule regular family meetings where you reevaluate these tasks and talk about how they are working for everyone.

When families take time to coordinate their schedules, you can create a kind of rhythm in your home. Children see how order relieves chaos, and they’re more likely to apply that to other parts of their lives. And best of all, it gets everyone on the same page so that disorder is kept to a minimum.

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