Depression in Pre-Teens

Mood swings are a trademark of the pre-teen years. But how can you tell when a simple case of the blues crosses over into depression?

“Pre-teens” and “depression” can be a dangerous combination. That’s why it’s important to know what signs to look for—and to be willing to intervene if we suspect a problem.

Chronic sleepiness is a key symptom. Children who don’t want to get up for school, or who consistently take naps during the day may be struggling with some form of anxiety or depression. They may also begin eating more or less than usual. Or stay irritated for weeks at a time. Some kids start shying away from their friends when they feel depressed.

If any of these symptoms ring a bell, talk to your doctor. And don’t be afraid to get professional help if you think your child needs it. Pre-teen depression is serious business, and should never be ignored.

More Tips

What would you say is your biggest struggle as a parent?

Many parents might point to TV and other media. Others might say peer pressure—and that is a big one. The wrong kinds of friends can do irreparable harm to our kids’ futures.

Most parents wouldn’t put up with sarcasm from their kids. But do we hold ourselves to the same standard?

We all struggle with fear from time to time. But when does fear become a full-fledged disorder?

So, got any good “in-law” stories? If you’re married, chances are you do!

Marriage is a difficult transition for everyone, especially parents. That’s why almost all couples have at least some problems getting along with their in-laws.

To teenagers, dating is like a field full of fresh flowers; to parents, the field is often filled with explosive land mines.

We hear a lot about mums struggling with “Empty Nest” Syndrome, but often it’s good ole’ dad who takes it the hardest.

You wouldn’t plant a garden and then sit back and hope it grows. Gardens take time and effort in order to flourish.

Peer pressure is a powerful force in a teen’s life. But not all peer pressure is bad for them.

We all need to feel like our life has purpose. But it’s even more critical for teens.

You want your kids to do more than just get along with each other. You want them to be best friends.

Pages