The Busyness Monster

There’s a big, hairy monster in your life, and he’s waiting to destroy your marriage.

The monster I’m talking about is “Busyness.” And he’s broken up more marriages than you and I could count. The worst part is, he does it almost completely unnoticed.

You start out your marriage completely enamoured with each other. All you want to do is be together. But then along come kids and a house and a career that puts you on the fast track. Before you know it, you’re moving so fast that you forget what your spouse looks like. And you can’t remember the last time you went out on a date, or had a romantic evening alone.

And that’s when the busyness monster does his greatest damage. Don’t let it happen. Take time for each other each day—even if you have to schedule it into your calendar. Marriage is too important to leave to chance.

More Tips

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You wouldn't let your car go years without checking under the hood, so why not give your marriage the same attention?

All couples argue from time to time. It’s how we argue that makes a difference in the outcome.

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