Agree to Disagree

Some couples say they can’t seem to agree on anything, when in truth, the arguments they have are just recurring ones.

Arguments may manifest themselves differently, but many of the core issues are usually the same. Some couples argue about money or time or how to raise the kids. But what they’re really struggling with is a different set of core values. And the solution is to recognize this pattern and then get to the heart of the issue.

For example, if money is behind most of your fights, ask yourself, “What is the difference between our basic attitudes toward money?” If one is a spender and the other is a saver, then the solution is a fair compromise. That means working out a budget that allows for savings, but also leaves a little for extra frills.

And remember that some disagreements will never be solved. The key to peace in these areas is to agree to disagree, and then move forward.

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